Blog : Treehouses and design

How does your garden grow?

How does your garden grow?

The humble pineapple. Well…actually, the pineapple is probably one of the least humble fruits out there! It has quite a regal ‘flare’, perched there atop its leafy coronet. I’m ashamed to say that it wasn’t until a trip to Panama last year that I found out how a pineapple grows. Can you believe that? When I saw it, I was amazed – much to the astonishment of Ariel who – growing up – saw pineapples in their natural environment on a daily basis.

In the last few blogs we’ve been writing about inspiration and looking at who inspires us. Rather than who, the question now is what inspires us?

The answer to this is simple…nature.

Inspired by nature

The bíku project is inspired by nature, through and through. From the treehouse designs to how the retreat will function as whole. It will be off grid – running on solar power and using water catchment systems. In addition, we will grow the majority of the food for the guest restaurant.

We have already been on an amazing journey with bíku, and we’re only just beginning. The project is giving us a new way of looking at and working with – and within – the world. It’s really only through an understanding of how the world – and nature – around us works that we can build anything within it – such as bíku! And the only true way to understand how the world around us works, is to notice it!!! To stop, take a breath from the craziness of modern-day living and take in your surroundings – the nature, the landscape. And this is part of our ‘living slow’ philosophy (or philoslothy!!). Read our recent blog on being philoslothical.

Once your take a closer look, you see that nature is much more than a random collection of pretty cool things. It is a fascinating, intricate, interconnected process. We want to draw from the naturally occurring systems and patterns that exist in nature, specifically in Bocas del Toro, and see which of them we can apply to the bíku retreat design.

While we may look, we don’t always see! I have looked at you in the supermarket many a time Mr Pineapple, but it was only when I got to Bocas del Toro that I saw you. Haha.

Until next time. #liveslow

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What makes a treehouse a treehouse?

What makes a treehouse a treehouse?

Our quest to create unique and magical treehouses for our b í k u retreat has led us to ask the question, ‘What makes a treehouse a treehouse?’ Before we began our journey, we didn’t think there was much debate around what constitutes a treehouse – but, along the way we have found treehouses of all shapes and sizes, including some that are not even built in trees! We were shocked too!

For us, there are three essentials of a treehouse, as well some added bonuses which make a treehouse stay truly unbeatable. At b í k u – we’re aiming for the fundamentals as well as that icing on the cake!

Essentials of a treehouse

A treehouse must be:

  1. Off the ground
  2. In a tree (number 2 normally helps with number 1!)
  3. Magical!

Added bonuses for treetop living

For an amazing treetop stay, your treehouse should have:

  1. A unique design
  2. A swing bridge (of course – and perhaps a spiral staircase)
  3. An amazing view

When is a treehouse not a treehouse?

Most common definitions of a treehouse mention a structure that is built in a tree. The Treehouse Guide further defines a treehouse as, ‘A structure built in or around a tree which interacts with, and relies upon, the tree for its support. A treehouse consists of a roofed platform defining a sheltered space which may be fully enclosed for protection from the elements’.

I love the question that the Guide then asks, ‘Is it acceptable to use ground supports for a treehouse?’ And the answer is, it depends! This is clearly a hot topic of debate within the treehouse community.

The Guide also sets out three scenarios when a structure is not a treehouse, including when the house is fully ground supported and when the tree support is not structurally critical.

We have to say that on our journey, we’ve come across a large number of places misdefined as treehouses. And, it can be hugely disappointing when you’re looking forward to all the magic, nostalgia and quirkiness of a treehouse stay and, instead, find yourself in a building on stilts. Don’t get us wrong, there are some truly amazing and unique retreats and structures built in tree canopies that are magical – which we would love to stay at. But, please, just don’t call them a treehouse.

Living-room treehouses

living-room, in Powys, Wales, does everything you’d expect and want from a treehouse, and more! Phenomenally designed, the treehouses almost disappear into the woodland. Nature and sustainability have been taken deeply into consideration. The treehouses are a piece of hobbit-like magic in a hidden valley that take you away from the daily grind to chance encounters with fairy tale creatures and …. Welsh sheep! It’s a beautiful place to be.

Photos from our visit to living-room, back in 2015.

 

 

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