Blog : Sustainability

Speaking with Giselle Barboza, founder of Eyes of the Street and KRIYAR

Speaking with Giselle Barboza, founder of Eyes of the Street and KRIYAR

‘I believe that the future of the world is in the hands of responsible businesses’

Eyes of the Street founder Giselle Barboza on the power of human connection, invisible communities and using business for good

I started the social project Eyes of the Street after working with Channel 4 on a documentary about child prostitution in the Northeast of Brazil. I produced the documentary from London, and when the images came back from Recife, Northeast Brazil, I saw kids as young as five and six smoking crack on the street at night and sleeping on the sidewalks. I had to stop and go out of the editing suite and cry. I felt awful. I felt like a complete failure as a human being. There was this one boy…he looked straight at the screen. He had these massive eyes. I looked at his eyes and it was as though I could feel exactly what he felt. In this moment I felt a profound connection. That’s why I named the project ‘Eyes of the Street’, after that little boy’s eyes, after I had felt that powerful human connection with him even though we had never met.

Eyes of the Street is a non-profit, independent project. We use a skill-building methodology that empowers kids through the use of creative tools such as photography and film. We go to ‘invisible communities’. Communities that few are talking to or working with. We come into the community, partnering with a local organisation. We run photography workshops and give kids cameras so they can capture the realities of their lives. We train community leaders and we leave all the equipment behind so they can continue the work once we leave. So, that’s the legacy.

I also founded a London-based, creative agency – KRIYAR, this means creativity in Sanskrit. I believe in business. I studied anthropology, and economics – as a form of human relation – was the reason for that. I wanted to understand the whole psychology of barter and trading. At the end of the day we trade. Trade is a relationship, money is a relationship, and it’s a belief that you’re assigned something. I believe that the future of the world is in the hands of responsible businesses. Businesses can be a force for good.

I think we are living during a shift, a mindset shift in the world. In each generation there are more people who are really pro-business, but business for good. You can’t say, ‘we have to end corporations, we have to end business and then the world will be a better place.’ This is an illusion. We love making things. We do need a token of exchange. We are heading in the right direction – we’re not quite there yet, but we are the generation experiencing perhaps the greatest mindset shift of all times.

Muhammad Yunus – founder of microcredit – is a great inspiration. I have been lucky enough to have met him twice. Yunus invented what we call today ‘social business’. For him, making a profit is investing in the social good of all. And it’s the same for me. When I say that I am pro-business, what I mean is, yes, let’s make as much wealth as possible and then use that wealth to create good things for everyone, and tackle social issues. That’s what a social business is about.

Eyes of the Street is not an institution with walls, we don’t have an office. During the workshops, we only stay inside when we are projecting the pictures and discussing them. The rest is completely dynamic, we are walking chatting, doing many exercises. That’s the power of photography. There was this boy and he was very shy and he would never speak. Never, ever. The way we understood his life was through his pictures. Through the pictures we build dialogue and it’s amazing how the pictures speak. The moments that register with the kids, the reason why they decide to capture something, in itself, tells us a huge amount about them.

Today the project is run by me and Daniel Meirinho, co-founder, who lives in Brazil. We are also fortunate to have four volunteers as part of the team and a board of supporters. Our model is very simple. We only raise funds to cover the cost of execution and everything else is donated – from equipment to services. This enables us to keep focused on why we do what we do and committed to our vision.

My vision for Project Eyes is much bigger. The key question is how do you create an environment for people, for the kids, to acquire skills to enable them to go out into the world and earn their living? The key for me is sustainability and the power of human creativity. That’s what Project Eyes harnesses – human creativity – ideas, vision, and seeing solutions. And this is core to any social business!

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Eyes of the Street’s next project will be in 2018 at the biggest landfill in Latin America, home for 1000 families. The landfill is called Jardim Gramacho, located in the outskirts of Rio de Janeiro. For more information or if you want to get involved with Eyes of the Street, visit their website. You can also find more information on Giselle’s creative agency KRIYAR on the company’s website. The company’s core services include film, design, production and creative consultancy. You can also follow Giselle on Instagram @gisellebarboza_.

Until next time #liveslow, #livesustainably

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Speaking with Lara Sengupta, founder of CorkYogis

Speaking with Lara Sengupta, founder of CorkYogis

‘In time it might change but at the moment it’s quite hard for social businesses to get investment’

CorkYogis founder Lara Sengupta on Dragons’ Den confusion, the future of CorkYogis and what’s needed for social business to thrive

To be honest I was completely terrified for two months before! You go to the audition for Dragons’ Den and then they give you a two-three month period where you know you’re going to be filmed but you have a gap between the filming. I was in India for those two months, doing some work with the charity over there. But the whole time, I was literally, terrified. You never know, sometimes you see a really lovely person with a great product and they [the Dragons] just tear them down. It was scary but at the same time it was good to push me out of my comfort zone. I was in there for an hour and a half, so in the 15 minutes that air, you don’t know which way they’ll swing it. They painted me in a good light – which was a relief.

I was prepared to be pulled apart on the financials, but in terms of the comment like, ‘oh, you seem confused, are you a business or a social enterprise’, I didn’t really know what to say. As far as I’m concerned, a social enterprise is a business and there are examples of amazing social businesses that do make money, a lot of money in fact. But people love them because of their social impact. I didn’t understand the comment really, and I didn’t want to reply, because I didn’t want to trip myself up! A lot of investors made their money at a time when social business didn’t really exist so I think it’s difficult for them to understand it as a business concept. I think in time it might change but at the moment it’s quite hard for social businesses to get investment. People have advised me to enhance the social aspect of CorkYogis when talking to customers but they say hide the social aspect as much as possible and lead on your ‘business side’ if you want investment.

TOMS inspires me. I knew I wanted to follow that business model with CorkYogis – we want our customers to be able to see what impact their purchase is making. Change Please is another social enterprise – completely different – that inspires me. Partnering with the Big Issue, they train homeless people as baristas, helping people get back in to work. TOMS didn’t get external investment. The founder sold his old business to fund TOMS. And Change Please got funding through the Big Issue. I don’t know a social business that has received big backing from investors in its early days.

We stand out in terms of our product as well as our social purpose. What makes our cork yoga mats different is that they are a lot more robust. We have done a lot of trial and error. The cork is very thin, so it doesn’t chip or crack as some other mats do. We work with a lot of yoga studios in London, especially hot yoga studios as our mats are really good for grip when you sweat. We’re currently focusing on getting in to the big studios like Gymbox. TriYoga has just started using our mats, which is exciting.

Everyone has business plans right at the beginning, but the way a business grows and develops is so different to how you think it’s going to be. We’ve had to keep adapting as we go. We’ve just started working with a sales team – which is great. They deal with the meetings with the prospective buyers – which is really handy as that is my worst nightmare! I guess hiring people to do jobs that you absolutely hate (read: are not very good at!) is the best way to spend money even if you don’t have a huge budget! Our focus in the next 2-3 years is to just keep growing, organically. We are splitting our time, focusing on increasing sales through the website and also targeting yoga studios. I would love to expand to the US eventually. So, yes, we’ll just keep working on the foundation and see where that takes us.

We’re working with the charity Destiny Foundation in India, who combat human trafficking and the challenges faced by the survivors of human trafficking by helping women learn employable skills. For every natural CorkYogis mat purchased, we provide a contribution towards a training course for one girl. It’s still early days, but maybe in the next year or so we’d also like to start our own charity, partnered with CorkYogis, so that we could develop our own courses and be able to better record, I guess, where the funds are going and the specific impact that they’re having.

I’m not sure if it’s possible to change investors’ views and standpoints, I think it’s more about different investors coming through. There needs to be more information available about how social businesses can raise funds. Most of the information out there is on how purely profit businesses can raise capital. And this is the route a lot of social businesses try to take – and it might not be the right or best one. Hopefully, the more exposure social businesses get, the more information there will be about how we can thrive.

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CorkYogis launched in April 2016 by Lara Sengupta. The company’s core product is its ‘luxury cork yoga mat with a social purpose.’ CorkYogi’s product range includes cork yoga mats, cork yoga blocks, yoga accessories and yoga packages. You can find CorkYogi products on their website and also on Woocommerce, Amazon and eBay.

 

Until next time #liveslow, #livesustainably

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A prickly business

A prickly business

Ananas Anam and its ‘natural leather alternative’ Piñatex® are the brainchild and vision of ‘ethical entrepreneur’ Dr Carmen Hijosa. Concerned by the toxic impact of mass-produced leather and polluting synthetic textiles seen by Dr Carmen Hijosa during her time in the Philippines advising on the leather industry, Carmen set out on a mission to find an alternative process and product. Piñatex® – a plant-based, non-woven textile made from pineapple leaf fibre – is the result of seven years of development. It continues to evolve and develop, along with the company that produces and manufactures the textile, Ananas Anam.

For those of you who receive our monthly newsletter, you will know that Ariel and I stumbled across Piñatex® at the Grand Designs Exhibition in London earlier this year. The textile was showcased as one of Keven McCloud’s ‘Green Heroes’ – and we can completely understand why.

Piñatex® is made from what is thought of – or was formerly thought of – as a waste product of pineapple agriculture – the leaf. Farmers, therefore, benefit from a new income stream without any additional costs. There is no need for additional water, land, fertiliser, etc. Pineapple fibres are used in traditional Filipino woven garments – and this local tradition is what helped to inspire Carmen, and her vision. A lot can be learnt from the local communities – from those who have lived in harmony with and adapted to their surroundings for years and generations.

Design is not just about product.
Design is about responsibility.’ – Dr. Carmen Hijosa

This quote from the Ananas Anam CEO captures the ethos behind Piñatex®. Social and environmental responsibility is at the heart of Dr Carmen Hijosa’s vision; a vision for a more sustainable future. The company’s guiding principles centre around a high social impact with a low environmental one.

And it’s not just about sustainability. It’s also about innovation – of thinking outside the box to come up with solutions for processes, practices and behaviours that have become the status quo. It’s about sustainability through innovation.

A business or a cause?

Significantly, Piñatex® is commercially viable and at the same time supports pineapple farming communities in the Philippines. Profits and a purpose. Helpfully, in the press pack sent to us by Ananas Anam, they define social enterprise as ‘an organisation that applies commercial strategies to maximize improvement in human and environmental well-being – including social impact.’ We are no longer in a world where there are two sides of the fence, profit (i.e. business) and nonprofit – perhaps we are starting to sit together on that fence. These two worlds seem to be coming closer together.

Piñatex® is being used in a variety of ways – finding its way into our everyday life. It’s being used by a number of designers including for footwear, other fashion items, furniture as well as automobile interiors. We see this as the future. You don’t have to reject a certain lifestyle in its entirety to want to or be able to make a difference, to have a social impact. It’s something we can all be a part of, day to day.

Let’s hope that more of us and more businesses follow Dr Carmen Hijosa’s lead. Carmen we salute you. Pineapples will never be the same again!

In next week’s Wednesday blog I speak to founder of CorkYogis, Lara Sengupta, and find out what she has been up to since Dragons’ Den (see our last blog post, ‘In the pursuit of profit or social purpose‘) and what the future holds for yogis of the cork kind…

Until next time #liveslow, #livesustainably

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In the pursuit of profit or social purpose?

In the pursuit of profit or social purpose?

Wow, November already. How did that happen? Am I allowed to use the ‘C’ word yet … or should I wait until December!? Over the next few weeks, in the run up to the Christmas (yes I said it) month of December, we will be taking a look at the concept of social business. Or should I say social enterprise? Or social venture? Or social entrepreneurship? In whichever of its guises, we want to know whether a business can have a social purpose and profit making as core aims.

bíku and bíku’s business model has been inspired by social business (13 September blog post). It is an area that interests me greatly and a topic that I see becoming increasingly important in all sectors and all businesses.

The customer is always right

Businesses have seen an increase in their customers wanting more information. More information about the quality of products, where products are coming from, how the products have been made, and whether what they are buying is eco-friendly. And this isn’t just happening at the higher end of the market, it’s even an issue for the budget supermarkets. Just look Lidl’s #LidlSurprises marketing campaign as one example! It’s affecting businesses across the board.

Businesses are increasingly having to adapt their business models to meet this demand. But how many businesses give pursuing a social purpose the same weight as pursuing profits? And can you prioritise both aims and still be successful?

But what about the investor?

An episode of Dragons’ Den sparked the idea to write this November series of blogs. I watched in amazement as Lara Sengupta from Cork Yogis pitched her high-end cork yoga mats with a social purpose (the business, not the mats!). Although in agreement that Lara’s business was doing a great thing, there were doubts from the Dragons about the investment opportunity. Each Dragon insisted that the focus should be on developing a strong business (read: profits) before giving a significant amount of the revenue to the social cause. In this case – helping to create ‘futures for vulnerable communities.’ CorkYogis works with Destiny Foundation, an NGO working to end human slavery and trafficking. For every CorkYogi mat purchased, the company contributes towards a training course for one girl. Destiny Foundation provides the training courses in sewing and literacy, giving the girls employable skills.

I have to say that I was surprised by the response from the Dragons to this social enterprise model. No one could disagree that the business would give back to the community. However, this appeared to be a peripheral concern to the business moguls, who continued to focus on numbers and the financial return on investment. The Dragons even asked Lara – on a few occasions – if what she was doing was even a real business.

Social impact investing is moving into the mainstream. Hopefully this is a sign that investors are beginning to see the social purpose in and of itself as part of the return on investment; just as big a part as the financial return.

A long way to go

I feel that business is heading in the right direction. This has been driven principally by customer demand. There’s still a way to go.

Mahatma Gandhi probably said it best, ‘Earth provides enough to satisfy every man’s needs, but not every man’s greed.’

Until next time #liveslow, #livesustainably

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How does your garden grow?

How does your garden grow?

The humble pineapple. Well…actually, the pineapple is probably one of the least humble fruits out there! It has quite a regal ‘flare’, perched there atop its leafy coronet. I’m ashamed to say that it wasn’t until a trip to Panama last year that I found out how a pineapple grows. Can you believe that? When I saw it, I was amazed – much to the astonishment of Ariel who – growing up – saw pineapples in their natural environment on a daily basis.

In the last few blogs we’ve been writing about inspiration and looking at who inspires us. Rather than who, the question now is what inspires us?

The answer to this is simple…nature.

Inspired by nature

The bíku project is inspired by nature, through and through. From the treehouse designs to how the retreat will function as whole. It will be off grid – running on solar power and using water catchment systems. In addition, we will grow the majority of the food for the guest restaurant.

We have already been on an amazing journey with bíku, and we’re only just beginning. The project is giving us a new way of looking at and working with – and within – the world. It’s really only through an understanding of how the world – and nature – around us works that we can build anything within it – such as bíku! And the only true way to understand how the world around us works, is to notice it!!! To stop, take a breath from the craziness of modern-day living and take in your surroundings – the nature, the landscape. And this is part of our ‘living slow’ philosophy (or philoslothy!!). Read our recent blog on being philoslothical.

Once your take a closer look, you see that nature is much more than a random collection of pretty cool things. It is a fascinating, intricate, interconnected process. We want to draw from the naturally occurring systems and patterns that exist in nature, specifically in Bocas del Toro, and see which of them we can apply to the bíku retreat design.

While we may look, we don’t always see! I have looked at you in the supermarket many a time Mr Pineapple, but it was only when I got to Bocas del Toro that I saw you. Haha.

Until next time. #liveslow

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Luxury vs. sustainability: bedfellows or paradox?

Luxury vs. sustainability: bedfellows or paradox?

In developing our b í k u treehouse retreat project we are often asked what we will offer, ‘Are you going for the eco and sustainable ‘thing’, or are you going for a high-end luxury, boutique retreat?’. We’ve always challenged this by asking why we have to choose one over the other. Can’t we offer luxury and sustainability? The question for us is, can luxury and sustainability go hand-in-hand or are they confined to being contradictory ideas?

Ethical ‘bling’?

Traditional notions of luxury might have us imagining sliding off silk sheets into a pool of pearls, and a quick spin in our sports car. It’s all glam, glitz and glorious. While eco and sustainability are associated with images of a vegan lifestyle, perhaps commune living, and wearing hessian fabrics. Now, I know these are extremes – but hopefully, point made. In their traditional guises luxury and sustainability are not symbiotic.

So what has changed? Is there a new way?

Where luxury and sustainability collide

In his 2016 article, ‘Luxury Brands Can No longer Ignore Sustainability’, published in the Harvard Business Review, Andrew Winston analyses the report, 2016 Predictions for the Luxury Industry: Sustainability and Innovation. The report identifies key pressures that are bringing luxury and sustainability closer together:

  • changing regulations
  • social pressures: from celebrity endorsements of sustainable living to the heightened expectations of companies, especially from Millennials
  • investor pressure – from those who are seeing the value in sustainable products
  • serious limitations on the earth’s natural resources

Although targeting the luxury retail industry, these pressures are equally applicable to the travel industry.

Luxury redefined

Looking at luxury defined as ‘very great comfort, especially among beautiful and expensive surroundings’, I find it easy to connect this to eco / sustainable travel. Great comfort is provided in a simple and innovative way that offers guests an intimate connection with nature and the place. There’s no doubt that the surroundings of most – if not all – eco lodges throughout the world are beautiful. And, speaking of ‘expensive’, well – nature is truly priceless. In my eyes, that’s all boxes ticked.

In my last blog I singled out a few of the retreats that are getting responsible travel ‘right’. Those same lodges – and more – are combining responsible travel with a new luxury, a natural luxury. In addition to the retreats themselves, a more recent trend, perhaps, has been the emergence of eco tour companies, booking agencies, travel agencies and hotelier ‘groups’. I recently stumbled upon a great company called Eco Companion, which is a booking engine for sustainable tours, projects and accommodation all around the world. If you get a chance, do check them out.

Another company that is – in their own words – ‘breaking new ground in eco-lux travel’ is The Cayuga Collection. This is a collection of eight sustainable luxury hotels and lodges in Costa Rica and Nicaragua. The collection redefines the symbiosis of luxury and sustainability through the concept of ‘Experience, Learn, Connect and Relax.’ We couldn’t agree more. Further support of their model is given by Lynn Cutter, Executive Vice President, National Geographic Travel who says The Cayuga Collection ‘properties are a shining example of how sustainability can be achieved with elegance and authenticity’.

A match made in eco-lux heaven

There’s a new luxury in town. It may not be glitz and it may not be glam – not in the traditional sense – but it offers more than that. The eco- or sustainable luxury of the travel world offers guests unforgettable, authentic experiences in nature and culture, the opportunity to know the true character of a place. Sticking by this traditional definition of luxury, ‘a pleasure which you do not often have the opportunity to enjoy’, eco-tourism and ‘true’ travelling has always been luxurious.

Until the next time – #slothlife

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