Speaking with Giselle Barboza, founder of Eyes of the Street and KRIYAR

Speaking with Giselle Barboza, founder of Eyes of the Street and KRIYAR

Speaking with Giselle Barboza, founder of Eyes of the Street and KRIYAR

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‘I believe that the future of the world is in the hands of responsible businesses’

Eyes of the Street founder Giselle Barboza on the power of human connection, invisible communities and using business for good

I started the social project Eyes of the Street after working with Channel 4 on a documentary about child prostitution in the Northeast of Brazil. I produced the documentary from London, and when the images came back from Recife, Northeast Brazil, I saw kids as young as five and six smoking crack on the street at night and sleeping on the sidewalks. I had to stop and go out of the editing suite and cry. I felt awful. I felt like a complete failure as a human being. There was this one boy…he looked straight at the screen. He had these massive eyes. I looked at his eyes and it was as though I could feel exactly what he felt. In this moment I felt a profound connection. That’s why I named the project ‘Eyes of the Street’, after that little boy’s eyes, after I had felt that powerful human connection with him even though we had never met.

Eyes of the Street is a non-profit, independent project. We use a skill-building methodology that empowers kids through the use of creative tools such as photography and film. We go to ‘invisible communities’. Communities that few are talking to or working with. We come into the community, partnering with a local organisation. We run photography workshops and give kids cameras so they can capture the realities of their lives. We train community leaders and we leave all the equipment behind so they can continue the work once we leave. So, that’s the legacy.

I also founded a London-based, creative agency – KRIYAR, this means creativity in Sanskrit. I believe in business. I studied anthropology, and economics – as a form of human relation – was the reason for that. I wanted to understand the whole psychology of barter and trading. At the end of the day we trade. Trade is a relationship, money is a relationship, and it’s a belief that you’re assigned something. I believe that the future of the world is in the hands of responsible businesses. Businesses can be a force for good.

I think we are living during a shift, a mindset shift in the world. In each generation there are more people who are really pro-business, but business for good. You can’t say, ‘we have to end corporations, we have to end business and then the world will be a better place.’ This is an illusion. We love making things. We do need a token of exchange. We are heading in the right direction – we’re not quite there yet, but we are the generation experiencing perhaps the greatest mindset shift of all times.

Muhammad Yunus – founder of microcredit – is a great inspiration. I have been lucky enough to have met him twice. Yunus invented what we call today ‘social business’. For him, making a profit is investing in the social good of all. And it’s the same for me. When I say that I am pro-business, what I mean is, yes, let’s make as much wealth as possible and then use that wealth to create good things for everyone, and tackle social issues. That’s what a social business is about.

Eyes of the Street is not an institution with walls, we don’t have an office. During the workshops, we only stay inside when we are projecting the pictures and discussing them. The rest is completely dynamic, we are walking chatting, doing many exercises. That’s the power of photography. There was this boy and he was very shy and he would never speak. Never, ever. The way we understood his life was through his pictures. Through the pictures we build dialogue and it’s amazing how the pictures speak. The moments that register with the kids, the reason why they decide to capture something, in itself, tells us a huge amount about them.

Today the project is run by me and Daniel Meirinho, co-founder, who lives in Brazil. We are also fortunate to have four volunteers as part of the team and a board of supporters. Our model is very simple. We only raise funds to cover the cost of execution and everything else is donated – from equipment to services. This enables us to keep focused on why we do what we do and committed to our vision.

My vision for Project Eyes is much bigger. The key question is how do you create an environment for people, for the kids, to acquire skills to enable them to go out into the world and earn their living? The key for me is sustainability and the power of human creativity. That’s what Project Eyes harnesses – human creativity – ideas, vision, and seeing solutions. And this is core to any social business!

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Eyes of the Street’s next project will be in 2018 at the biggest landfill in Latin America, home for 1000 families. The landfill is called Jardim Gramacho, located in the outskirts of Rio de Janeiro. For more information or if you want to get involved with Eyes of the Street, visit their website. You can also find more information on Giselle’s creative agency KRIYAR on the company’s website. The company’s core services include film, design, production and creative consultancy. You can also follow Giselle on Instagram @gisellebarboza_.

Until next time #liveslow, #livesustainably

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